Fandom

Wikia Gaming

FM Towns

26,860pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

The FM Towns (エフエムタウンズ Efu Emu Taunzu?) system is a Japanese personal computer, built by Fujitsu from February 1989 to the summer of 1997.

Graphics

The FM Towns featured video modes ranging from 320×200 to 720×512 resolutions,[1] with 16 to 32,768 simultaneous colours out of a possible 4096 to 16.777 million (depending on the video mode); most of these video modes had two memory pages, and it allowed the use of up to 1024 sprites of 16×16 pixels each. It also had a built-in font ROM for the display of kanji characters.

One unique feature of the FM Towns system was the ability to overlay different video modes; for example, the 320×200 video mode with 32,768 colours could be overlaid with a 640×480 mode using 16 colours, which allowed games to combine high-colour graphics with high-resolution kanji text.

It uses 640 KB of video RAM, including 512 KB VRAM and 128 KB sprite RAM.[2] FM Towns supports the following graphics modes:

Bitmap modes:[3]

  1. 640×819 virtual (640×400 display) @ 16 out of 4096 colors - overlay support with mode 2
  2. 640×819 virtual (640×200 display) @ 16 out of 4096 colors - overlay support with mode 1
  3. 1024×512 virtual (640×480 display) @ 16 out of 4096 colors - overlay support with modes 5 or 10
  4. 1024×512 virtual (640×400 display) @ 16 out of 4096 colors - overlay support with mode 6
  5. 256×512 virtual (256×256 display, interlaced) @ 32,768 colors - overlay support with modes 3 or 10
  6. 256×512 virtual (256×256 display, progressive) @ 32,768 colors - overlay support with mode 4
  7. 256×512 virtual (256×240 display, interlaced) @ 32,768 colors - overlay support with mode 9
  8. 256×512 virtual (256×240 display, progressive) @ 32,768 colors - overlay support with mode 11
  9. 512×256 virtual (360×240 display) @ 32,768 colors - overlay support with mode 7
  10. 512×256 virtual (320×240 display, 31 kHz) @ 32,768 colors - overlay support with modes 3 or 5
  11. 512×256 virtual (320×240 display, 15 kHz) @ 32,768 colors - overlay support with mode 8
  12. 1024×512 virtual (640×480 display) @ 256 out of 16,777,216 colors - overlay not supported
  13. 1024×512 virtual (640×400 display) @ 256 out of 16,777,216 colors - overlay not supported
  14. 1024×512 virtual (720×480 display) @ 256 out of 16,777,216 colors - overlay not supported
  15. 512×512 virtual (320×480 display, progressive) @ 32,768 colors - overlay not supported
  16. 512×512 virtual (320×480 display, interlaced) @ 32,768 colors - overlay not supported
  17. 512×512 virtual (512×480 display, progressive) @ 32,768 colors - overlay not supported
  18. 512×512 virtual (512×480 display, interlaced) @ 32,768 colors - overlay not supported

Sprite layer:[3]

Up to two graphical layers can be overlaid, whether it is two bitmap layers, or the sprite layer with a bitmap background layer. The latter is useful for action games, though the sprite function is not as advanced as that of rival 16-bit computer, the Sharp X68000.[3] When the sprite layer is used, it is rendered to VRAM layer 1 on top, with the bitmap background as VRAM layer 0 below. When two bitmap layers are used, then both are rendered to VRAM layers 0 and 1.[1]

See also

References

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki