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Killer application

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A killer application (commonly shortened to killer app) is a program or video game that is so useful or excellent that people will buy a particular computer hardware, gaming console and/or operating system simply to run that program.

In other words, consumers would buy the (usually expensive) hardware just to run that application. A killer app can substantially increase sales of the platform on which it runs.[1][2]

Popular killer apps in gaming

The term has also been applied to computer and video games that cause consumers to buy a particular video game console or gaming hardware over a competing one. Examples of a video game killer applications are:

Also known as

  • Killer title
  • System seller

External Links

See also

References

  1. Scannell, Ed (February 20, 1989). "OS/2: Waiting for the Killer Applications". InfoWorld (Menlo Park, CA: InfoWorld Publications) 11 (8): pp 41–45. ISSN 0199-6649. http://books.google.com/books?id=JzoEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PT40.  Early use of the term "Killer Application".
  2. Kask, Alex (September 18, 1989). "Revolutionary Products Are Not in the Industry's Near Future". InfoWorld (Menlo Park, CA: InfoWorld Publications) 11 (38): p. 68. ISSN 0199-6649. http://books.google.com/books?id=uTAEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PT83.  Early use of the term "Killer App".
  3. "The Definitive Space Invaders". Retro Gamer (Imagine Publishing) (41): 24–33. September 2007. http://www.nowgamer.com/features/152/the-definitive-space-invaders-part-1. Retrieved 2011-04-20. 
  4. http://www.gametrailers.com/video/top-10-gt-countdown/712273
  5. Craig Glenday, ed (2008-03-11). "Hardware History II". Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008. Guinness World Records. Guinness. p. 27. ISBN 978-1-904994-21-3.

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