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PlayStation 2 internal display clock

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PS2 Internal Display Clock A

PS2 internal display clock

The PlayStation 2 internal display clock is a graphical display found on the PlayStation 2 game console, which consists of a series of flying orbs and rotating hexagon crystal rods that make up the face of an analog 12-hour clock. This clock can be seen in the background of the PS2's internal System Configuration menu, and is kept in sync with the PlayStation 2 internal time-keeping clock.

The clock appears to be slowly falling down an endless wormhole while the sounds of crashing beach waves and low rumbles are heard.

The clock can be seen by starting up the PlayStation 2 without any discs in the machine, and selecting the System Configuration menu. While the menu settings are displayed, the clock is blurred out and somewhat obstructed by the menu text. The clock can be brought into focus and fully unobstructed by pressing the square button on the PS2 controller while in the System Configuration menu.

The internal display clock can be found on all hardware revisions of the PlayStation 2.

Mathematical and chronological design

The flying orbs and rotating crystal rods make up a representation of chronological and mathematical elements.

The orbs

There are 7 orbs continually flying in a spherical swirling pattern near the center of the clock. The flying pattern and frequent grouping of the orbs represent a number of chronological elements related to the current time set on the PS2 machine. As well, the seven orbs represent the seven days of the week and are inert.

Seconds

The orbs' grouping throughout the course of one minute signify the lowest common denominator (LCD) of the number 60, representing the number of seconds in one minute. There are 6 possible combinations of orb groupings in relation to the number of seconds elapsed at that moment.

  • When the number of seconds on any given minute is 0:00, all 7 orbs combine to form one orb for that instant. This represents the lowest common denominator of 1 (60 into 60). The orbs will also meet at the exact spot where the hour hand would be on an analog clock at that moment.
  • When the number of seconds on any given minute is 0:30, all 7 orbs combine to form two orbs. This represents the lowest common denominator of 2 (30 into 60), or one half minute.
  • When the number of seconds on any given minute is 0:20 or 0:40, all 7 orbs combine to form three orbs. This represents the lowest common denominator of 3 (20 into 60), or one third of a minute
  • When the number of seconds on any given minute is 0:15 or 0:45, all 7 orbs combine to form four orbs. This represents the lowest common denominator of 4 (15 into 60), or one fourth of a minute.
  • When the number of seconds on any given minute is 0:12, 0:24, 0:36, or 0:48, all 7 orbs combine to form five orbs. This represents the lowest common denominator of 5 (12 into 60), or one fifth of a minute
  • When the number of seconds on any given minute is 0:10 or 0:50, all 7 orbs combine to form six orbs. This represents the lowest common denominator of 6 (10 into 60), or one sixth of a minute.

The lowest possible common denominator always takes precedence. Even though 0:30 technically falls into the LCD groups of 4 (1/4 minute) and 6 (1/6 minute), the LCD of 2 (1/2 minute) takes precedence, and will always show 2 orbs at 0:30 instead of 4 or 6.

Minutes/Hours

At the beginning of every hour, the sphere in which the orbs rotate is initially a very small diameter. As the hour progresses, the sphere of rotating orbs gradually increases in diameter until the next hour is reached.

The crystal rods

There are 12 crystal rods which make up the face of an analog clock. Each crystal rotates, as well as the entire face of the clock itself. The continual revolution and rotation of these rods represent a number of time elements in relation to the current hour of time.

Seconds

The entire face of the clock has a rate of one 180° rotation every 30 seconds (360° rotation every 60 seconds). The angle of rotation will be parallel to the viewer at :00 and :30 seconds. Likewise, the angle of rotation will be perpendicular to the viewer at :15 and :45 seconds.

Minutes/Hours

When the top of the hour occurs, the crystal rod representing that hour appears to fill up with liquid and essentially become highlighted. As the hour progresses, the liquid slowly drains from the crystal rod, representing the number of minutes left in the hour. The entire clock also makes its axis of rotation based on the highlighted rod. At the top of the next hour, the next rod will again fill up with liquid, and the clock's axis of rotation will be shifted to the new crystal rod.

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