Fandom

Wikia Gaming

The Legend of Zelda (CD-i series)

26,878pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

Template:Pp-move-vandalism

Link: The Faces of Evil, Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, and Zelda’s Adventure are three action-adventure games produced by Philips for the CD-i as part of The Legend of Zelda video game series. The Faces of Evil and The Wand of Gamelon were developed by Animation Magic and released on October 10, 1993 and Zelda's Adventure was developed by Viridis and released on June 5, 1994.

After Nintendo decided not to have Philips create a CD add-on to the Super Nintendo, Nintendo gave Philips permission to use five Nintendo characters in their games for the CD-i. The games were given little funding or time for completion, and Nintendo provided only cursory input.

The games were poorly received by video game critics, due to the barely functional controls and especially known for the cutscenes that used full motion video. The Philips CD-i did not sell well and the games became very valuable. Nintendo rarely acknowledges the games' existence, even practically erasing them from history in a statement connected to The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, and the games are a source of ridicule by many reviewers.

Gameplay

Faces of Evil and Wand of Gamelon are played using the side-scrolling view introduced in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, while Zelda's Adventure has a top-down view reminiscent of the original The Legend of Zelda.[1][3] All the CD-i Zelda games begin with animated FMVs to illustrate the capabilities of the CD-ROM format, save Zelda’s Adventure, which begins with live action video.[3]

File:Zeldafacesofevil2.jpg

Link: The Faces of Evil

The player controls Link, who must find and defeat "the evil forces of Ganon", rescue Princess Zelda and become the hero of Koridai. When the player begins this quest, three areas are initially available, accessible through Gwonam's map. The player can access the areas on the map by moving the on-screen cursor over one of the areas and pressing a certain button.[4]

Gwonam, who aids the player in the quest, tells Link there is no time to pack. His sword would be enough.[5] As such, the player is only equipped with a sword and shield at the beginning of the game.[4] The sword is used to attack enemies, fire deadly Power Blasts and communicate with friendly villagers.[4] Meanwhile, the shield can deflect attacks thrown at the player.[4] The shield is automatically lifted when the player is standing still or crouching.[4] Other helpful tools, such as lamp oil (for lighting a lamp), rope (for climbing) and bombs (which can destroy some obstacles) are available for a price at Morshu's shop in Goronu.[4][6] The rubies (known as "rupees" in other Zelda titles) that Morshu takes as currency can be obtained by defeating enemies.[4][4] To pick up these gems, the player must strike them with the sword before they disappear.[4] Rubies differ from rupees in that green rupees are worth 1, blue rupees are worth 5 and red rupees are worth 20 - while red rubies are worth 1, green are worth 5 and blue are worth 10.[7]

Link's health is measured in "Life Hearts". The number of Life Hearts the player currently has is shown on the upper-left corner of the screen when Link is walking around the island. Although the player begins the game with only three hearts, there are ways to earn more. Each time Link is injured, he will lose at least one-half of a heart.[4] The first two times Link runs out of Life Hearts, the player will be given the option of continuing from near the point where Link's last heart was lost. When Link loses his hearts for a third time, he will be returned to the map, and the player will have to start the level from the beginning. Returning to the map replenishes Link's Life Hearts and lives, and he will retain any items and rubies he picked up.[4]

Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon

The player controls Princess Zelda, who must find and defeat Ganon and rescue both King Harkinian and Link to become the heroine of Gamelon. When the player begins this quest, three areas are initially available, accessible through Impa's map. The player can access the areas on the map by moving the on-screen cursor over one of the areas and pressing a button.[8]

At the beginning of the game, the player is only equipped with a sword and shield. The sword is used to attack enemies, fire deadly Power Blasts and communicate with friendly villagers, whereas the shield can deflect projectile attacks thrown at the player. The shield is automatically lifted when the player is standing still or crouching. Other helpful tools, such as lamp oil (for lighting a lamp), rope (for climbing) and bombs (which can destroy some obstacles) are available for a price at the General Shop in Sakado.[8][9] The rubies that the Merchant takes as currency can be obtained by defeating enemies. Green rupees are worth 1, blue rupees are worth 5 and red rupees are worth 20. To pick up these gems, the player must strike them with the sword before they disappear, unlike most conventional Zelda games where rupees could be collected by simply walking over them.[8]

Zelda's health is measured in "Life Hearts". The number of Life Hearts the player currently has is shown on the upper-left corner of the screen when Zelda is walking around the island. Although the player begins the game with only three hearts, there are ways to earn more. Each time Zelda is injured, she will lose at least one-half of a heart.[8] The first two times Zelda runs out of Life Hearts, the player will be given the option of continuing from near the point where Zelda's last heart was lost. When Zelda loses her hearts for a third time, she will be returned to the map, and the player will have to start the level from the beginning. Returning to the map replenishes Zelda's Life Hearts and lives, and she will retain any items and rubies she picked up.[8]

Zelda's Adventure

File:Zeldasadventure1.jpg

Unlike the previous two CD-i Zelda games, which take the side-scrolling view from Zelda II, Zelda's Adventure is played with the same top-down view found in The Legend of Zelda.[10] Playing as Princess Zelda, the aim is to fight through the Seven Shrines of the Underworld to collect the celestial signs, and bring the land of Tolemac to an Age of Lightness.[10][11]

Unlike the other two games, Zelda's Adventure was created by Viridis, an entirely different company, with a change in style and gameplay.[10][11] Gameplay is very much like the original The Legend of Zelda and The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, with an overworld that allows access to individual dungeons.[11][12] The FMV sequences which explain the plot are live action instead of animated.[12] Instead of dialogue boxes like traditional Zelda games, this game uses voice acting.

Plot

The Faces of Evil

Link, the main protagonist of the series, lounges in Hyrule Castle and complains to King Harkinian that he is bored now that the kingdom of Hyrule is at peace, to which the king responds that peace is "what all true warriors strive for".[13][14] A wizard named Gwonam visits the King and Link on a magic carpet and tells them that Ganon has taken over the far-off island of Koridai,[15] further explaining that only Link can stop him.[16] Link is transported to Koridai and shown by the wizard the fabled island with giant stone statues known as the Faces of Evil, which he must conquer.[3][17][18] During Link's time in Koridai, Princess Zelda is kidnapped by Ganon and is kept in his lair.[14][19]

Later in his journey, Link is sent to Fortress Centrum to retrieve the Treasure of Death for an Ice Queen.[20] At the fortress, Link finds what appears to be a sleeping Zelda. Upon awakening her, however, Zelda transforms into Goronu, a shapeshifting necromancer who works for Ganon. After defeating Goronu, Link retrieves the Crystal of Reflection, which allows his shield to reflect curses.[21] Link then proceeds to defeat Ganon's minions, which include the revived Goronu, the anthropomorphic pig Harlequin, the armored pyrokinetic Militron, the three-eyed wolfgirl Lupay, and the gluttonous cyclops Glutko, from which the Book of Koridai is retrieved. A translator named Ipo, who can read the Book of Koridai, reveals that the Book itself is enough to defeat Ganon.[22]

After trekking through Ganon's Lair,[23] Link finally reaches Ganon, who attempts to recruit Link with the promise of great power and the threat of murder,[24] but Link turns down his offer by imprisoning him in the Book of Koridai.[25] Link awakens Zelda and tells her that he had just defeated Ganon, to which she is skeptical.[26] Gwonam appears and congratulates Link on imprisoning Ganon. He shows Link a recovering Koridai and declares him the island's hero, whereupon Link declares himself to be the victor. However, Zelda refuses to kiss him as a reward.[27]

The Wand of Gamelon

King Harkinian announces his plan to aid Duke Onkled of Gamelon when the latter falls under attack by Ganon,[28][29] and orders Zelda to send Link for backup in case that he doesen't return from his mission within a month.[30] A month passes without word from the King,[31] so Zelda sends Link to find him.[28][32]

When he too goes missing,[28] Zelda ventures off to Gamelon (accompanied by an elderly Impa) to find both Link and the King.[28][33] During Zelda's time in Gamelon, Impa discovers that King Harkinian has been captured, and that Link has engaged in a battle, of which the outcome is unclear.[34] As she adventures across the island, Zelda meets many friendly characters and also defeats the villains Gibdo and Iron Knuckle. She also meets a woman named Lady Alma, who is being held prisoner by Wizzrobe, who in this game is portrayed as an individual character.

After defeating Wizzrobe and rescuing Lady Alma, she gives her a canteen that she claims Link gave her in exchange for a kiss. Later on Zelda reaches Duke Onkled's palace, Domodai Palace, where it is revealed that Duke Onkled has betrayed the King and is working for Ganon.[35] She storms the palace, kills Ganon's minion Hectan, and saves a Spaniard, who works for the King who was being held prisoner by him. He reveals the secret entrance to Onkled's chamber, and when they confront him he is blackmailed into revealing the entrance to Reesong Palace, where Ganon has taken residence.[36]

Before traveling there, Zelda goes to the Shrine of Gamelon to obtain the Wand needed to defeat Ganon by defeating the head-switching chimera Omfak, and also visits Nokani Forest to obtain the magic lantern that clears the darkness around Ganon. At Reesong Palace, Zelda fights Ganon and incapacitates him with the Wand, and rescues her father. Back at Hyrule Castle, Duke Onkled is turned over to the king, begging for mercy. He is arrested and sentenced to community service. having to "scrub all the floors in Hyrule" before the king will talk to him about mercy.[37] However, it is still unknown what has happened to Link, until Lady Alma makes a derogatory comment about him, prompting Zelda to throw her mirror against the wall, smashing it. This causes Link to magically materialize, seemingly having been trapped in the mirror (why he was in there is never explained). The game ends with everyone laughing at Link's general obliviousness.

Zelda's Adventure

Ganon has kidnapped Link, and stolen the seven celestial signs, creating an "Age of Darkness" in the kingdom of Tolemac.[38] Princess Zelda learns from the court astrologer Gaspra (played by actor Mark Andrade) that she must collect the signs to defeat Ganon and save Link.[3][12]

Development

In 1989, Nintendo signed a deal with Sony to begin development of a CD-ROM-based system known as the "Nintendo PlayStation" or the SNES CD to be an add-on to the Super Nintendo Entertainment System that would allow for FMV and larger games.[18][39] However, Nintendo broke the agreement and instead signed with Philips to make the add-on, which caused Sony to spin off their add-on into its own console called the PlayStation.[3][18][40] Witnessing the poor reception of the Sega Mega-CD, Nintendo scrapped the idea of making an add-on entirely.[18][39] As part of dissolving the agreement with Philips, Nintendo gave them the license to use five of their characters, including Link, Princess Zelda, and Ganon, for games on Philips's console called the CD-i, after the partnership's dissolution.[2][39] Contracting out to independent studios, Philips subsequently used the characters to create three games for the "CD-i", with Nintendo taking no part in their development except to give input on the look of the characters.[14][39] Philips insisted that all aspects of the CD-i's capabilities, including FMV, should be used.[28] As the system had not been designed as a dedicated video game console, there were several technical limitations, such as an infrared controller that lagged behind the on-screen action.[28] The team that created the first two games consisted of four artists, three programmers and one musician and were given a little over a year to create both games.[28] The voice of Princess Zelda was provided by Bonnie Jean Wilbur and the voice of Link by Jeffrey Rath, while additional voices were provided by Jeffrey Nelson, Mark Berry, Natalie Brown, Karen Grace, Josie McElroy, Marguerite Scott and Paul Wann.[41]

Wand of Gamelon and Faces of Evil were the first Nintendo-licensed games released on the Philips CD-i.[1] The two games were given the relatively low budgets of approximately $600,000 each and it was decided by the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based development team Animation Magic, led by Dale DeSharon, to develop the two games in tandem and have them share the same graphics engine to more efficiently use the budget.[42] The animated cutscenes were created by a team of six animators from Russia who were flown to the United States for the project.

The backgrounds for Zelda's Adventure were created out of videos of scenery near Santa Monica Boulevard in West L.A., footage of Hawaii taken from a helicopter, and developers' vacation photos.[43] This decision took up much of the games' RAM usage, causing backgrounds to scroll slowly, and developers were extremely frustrated. Space was so limited that how to utilize one or two kilobytes of free space was the cause of much argument.[43] The composer for Zelda's Adventure also played the part of Gaspra in the games' cut scenes.[43] The houses and interiors built for the cut scenes were built as scale models.[43] Developers have stated they were not influenced by the first two CD-i Zelda games.[43] Zelda's Adventure spent two years being tested, longer than it took to develop the game.[43] Much more music was composed for the game than was used.[43] Developers had difficulty making sure all the areas of the game had proper background masking.[43]

Reception

The magazine Electronic Gaming Monthly considers all three games as some of the worst video games ever made.[44] Gametrailers.com also rated Legend of Zelda: Wand of Gamelon as the fifth worst game of all time.[45] IGN referred to the games' cutscenes as "infamous" and "cheesy"; other reviewers called them "bizarre" and "an absolute joke".[1][39][46] The graphics of Zelda's Adventure were called "blurry and digitized".[1] Wired magazine said that the graphics were some of the worst ever encountered, and that the animation on the first two Zelda games was extremely simple and stilted and that the graphics had several glitches.[3] Danny Cowan of 1UP.com called Zelda's Adventure "unplayable" due to the jerky frame rate, unresponsive controls and long load times.[1] Another flaw was that the game could not produce both sound effects and music at the same time.[1] The voice acting, done by local AFTRA actors, was criticized as misdirected, amateurish, jarring, and laughable; Zelda's Adventure's acting was also criticized as unprofessional.[1][14][47][48] The first two games received praise for their detailed and well-drawn in-game backgrounds and "pretty decent" gameplay, making them some of the best games on the CD-i, despite its controls.[1][28][42] The audio was thought to be "average", and not up to the usual Zelda quality.[28]

1UP.com called the box art of Zelda's Adventure one of the 15 worst ever made.[49] Nintendo rarely acknowledges the CD-i games, and claimed in 2003 that if a player owned a Game Boy Player and the GameCube compilation of Zelda known as The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, that player could play every Zelda game in existence on the GameCube,[50] a statement that could only be true if the CD-i games were disregarded. Zelda's Adventure was released as the Philips CD-i began to cease production and has become very rare over time, as have the first two Philips Zelda games; Zelda's Adventure is regularly sold for over $100.[1][51]

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 Cowan, Danny (2006-04-25). CDi: The Ugly Duckling. 1UP.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Wilson, Mark (2007-06-05). This Day in Gaming, June 5th. Kotaku. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Kohler, Chris (2008-03-24). Game. Wired (magazine). Archived from the original on May 1, 2008 Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 Animation Magic (1993). Link: The Faces of Evil Template:Noitalic. Philips Media. 
  5. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (9000) "Link: Great! I'll grab my stuff! / Gwonam: There is no time. Your sword is enough."
  6. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Goronu Shop. (1993) "Morshu the Shopkeeper: Lamp oil, rope, bombs. You want it? It's yours, my friend. As long as you have enough rupees."
  7. Chiucchi, Vincent (2007-09-19). 411mania.com: Games - The Hall of Shame 09.19.07: The Nintendo Phillips CD-I Games:. Retrieved on 2008-05-29.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 Animation Magic (1993). Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon Template:Noitalic. Philips Media. 
  9. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Sakado General Shop. (1993) "General Shop Merchant: Course I'm on your side, but I still have to sell the stuff. Just pick what you want. I'll handle the rubies."
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 IGN: Zelda's Adventure. IGN. Retrieved on 2008-04-15.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Zelda's Adventure for CD-i. MobyGames. Retrieved on 2008-04-15.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 Zelda Elements Staff (2008-01-01). Overview: Zelda's Adventure. Zelda Elements. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  13. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "Link: Gee! It sure is boring around here. / King Harkinian: My boy, this peace is what all true warriors strive for. / Link: I just wonder what Ganon's up to."
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 Zelda Elements Staff (2008-01-01). Overview: Link: The Faces of Evil. Zelda Elements. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007 Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  15. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "Gwonam: Your Majesty, Ganon and his minions have seized the island of Koridai."
  16. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "Gwonam: It is written: only Link can defeat Ganon."
  17. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "Link: Wow! What're all those heads?! / Gwonam: These are the Faces of Evil. You must conquer each."
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 Zelda Elements Staff (2008-01-01). Overview: CDi Series. Zelda Elements. Archived from the original on March 6, 2008 Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  19. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Firestone Lake. (1993) "Ganon: In the darkest nightmare hour, when not moon nor sun has risen, I take Zelda through my power. I shall keep her in my prison.Also there are scenes popular From YouTube Poop"
  20. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Serigon Caves. (1993) "Ice Queen: Before you face the foul fiend Ganon, you must conquer Fortress Centrum, where the Treasure of Death is hidden. Bring it to me. Begone."
  21. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Serigon Caves. (1993) "Ice Queen: This shield both sword and spear reflects, but cannot stop the vilest curse. This crystal makes the shield reflect, cursing the curser with twice the curse."
  22. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Nortinka. (1993) "Ipo the Reader: Listen. Such is the power of the Prince of Darkness that he can kill with a single look. Attacks against Ganon will prove fruitless unless Link attacks with the sacred book."
  23. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Ganon's Lair. (1993)
  24. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Ganon's Lair. (1993) "Ganon: Join me, Link, and I will make your face the greatest in Koridai, or else you will die!"
  25. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Ganon's Lair. (1993) "Ganon: No! Not into the pit! It burrrns!!"
  26. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Ending sequence. (1993) "Princess Zelda: Why'd you do that? / Link: I just saved you from Ganon! / Princess Zelda: You did not."
  27. Animation Magic. Link: The Faces of Evil. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Ending sequence. (1993) "Gwonam: Well done, Link! Ganon is once again imprisoned. Come. Look. Already Koridai is returning to harmony. The birds are singing! Isn't it beautiful? / Link: Golly! / Gwonam: As it is written, you, Link, are the hero of Koridai! / Link: I guess that's worth as kiss, huh? / Princess Zelda: Ha! / Link: I won!"
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 28.3 28.4 28.5 28.6 28.7 28.8 Zelda Elements Staff (2008-01-01). Overview: Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. Zelda Elements. Archived from the original on February 20, 2008 Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  29. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "King Harkinian: Zelda, Duke Onkled is under attack by the evil forces of Ganon. I'm going to Gamelon to aid him."
  30. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "King Harkinian: If you don't hear from me in a month, send Link."
  31. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "Princess Zelda: (sighs) A whole month gone, and still no word."
  32. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "Princess Zelda: Link, go to Gamelon and find my father. / Link: Great! I can't wait to bomb some Dodongos!"
  33. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1993) "Princess Zelda: Wake up, Impa. We're going to Gamelon. / Impa: (yawning) All right, dear. I'll get the Triforce of Wisdom."
  34. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Sakado. (1993) "Impa: Oh, my. Your father has been captured! / Princess Zelda: What about Link? / Impa: He's been in a terrible fight! I can't tell what happened!"
  35. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Dodomai Palace. (1993) "Spaniard: Duke Onkled betrayed the King! / Princess Zelda: I know."
  36. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Dodomai Palace. (1993) "Duke Onkled: D-Don't hurt me, Zelda! I'll tell you the secret way into Reesong Palace. / Princess Zelda: You better talk fast. / Duke Onkled: Go all the way left and move the rug. This key opens the gate."
  37. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Ending sequence. (1993) "Duke Onkled: Please! Your omnipotence! Have mercy! / King Harkinian: After you've scrubbed all the floors in Hyrule, then we can talk about mercy! Take him away!"
  38. Viridis. Zelda's Adventure. (Philips Media). Philips CD-i. Level/area: Opening sequence. (1994) "Gaspra the Astronomer: And so it was that Gannon, Lord of Darkness, had taken over Tolemac. He had stolen the treasured celestial signs and captured Link!"
  39. 39.0 39.1 39.2 39.3 39.4 GameTrailers Staff (2006-10-22). The Legend of Zelda Retrospective Zelda Retrospective Part 3. GameTrailers. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  40. GameSpy Staff (2008-01-01). Nintendo: From Hero to Zero. GameSpy. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  41. Animation Magic. Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon. (Philips). CD-i. Level/area: Credits. (1993-10-10)
  42. 42.0 42.1 Szczepaniak, John (2008-01-01). Zelda: Wand of Gamelon / Link: Faces of Evil - Phillips CD-I (1993). Hardcore Gaming 101. Retrieved on 2010-02-04.
  43. 43.0 43.1 43.2 43.3 43.4 43.5 43.6 43.7 Bas (2007-03-08). Zelda, Voyeur, and a man who worked on both CD-i projects.... Interactive Dreams. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  44. Reiley, Sean (2007-01-01). #6: Zelda: Wand of Gamelon (CDI). Seanbaby.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  45. Top Ten Best and Worst Games of All Time. Gametrailers.com (2006-11-17). Retrieved on 2009-12-27.
  46. Michael S. Drucker (2005-09-30). The Legend of Zelda: The Complete Animated Series. IGN. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  47. Szczepaniak, John. "Zelda: 'Wand of Gamelon' & 'Link: Faces of Evil'". Retro Gamer (27): pp. 52–57 .
  48. Salas, Randy A. (2007-03-04). Game over; Think again before bringing back these vintage titles. Star Tribune. p. 4F 
  49. Sharkey, Scott (2007-03-30). Hey Covers...You Suck!. 1UP.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  50. Kidman, Alex (2004-02-08). Legend Of Zelda Collector's Edition. CNET.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  51. Stuart, Keith (2007-04-19). Technology: Gamesblog: Yesterday's games could be gold dust to collectors. The Guardian. p. 3 

External links

Template:Wikiquote

ko:CD-i 젤다 게임

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki